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an Evening With Iris Dement | Minneapolis, MN | Cedar Cultural Center - Midnimo | December 10, 2017
  • Iris DeMent 1
  • an Evening With Iris Dement 1
  • Cedar Cultural Center - Midnimo 1 | Minneapolis, MN
  • Cedar Cultural Center - Midnimo 2 | Minneapolis, MN

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an Evening With Iris Dement
Cedar Cultural Center - Midnimo in Minneapolis

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It was by pure chance that Iris DeMent opened the book of Russian poetry sitting on her piano bench to Anna Akhmatova's "Like A White Stone." She'd never heard of the poet before, and didn't even consider herself much of a poetry buff, but a friend had leant her the anthology and it only seemed polite that she skim it enough to have something interesting to say when she returned it. As she read, though, a curious sensation swept over her.

"I didn't feel like I was alone anymore," remembers DeMent. "I felt as if somebody walked in the room and said to me, 'Set that to music.'"

So she did. The melody just poured out of her almost instantly. She turned the page and it happened again, and again after that, and before she even fully understood it, she was already deep into writing what would become 'The Trackless Woods,' an album which sets Akhmatova's poetry to music for the first time ever.

'The Trackless Woods,' DeMent's sixth studio album, is unlike anything else in her illustrious career. Beginning with her 1992 debut, 'Infamous Angel,' which was hailed as "an essential album of the 1990's" by Rolling Stone, DeMent released a series of stellar records that established her as "one of the finest singer-songwriters in America" according to The Guardian. The music earned her multiple Grammy nominations, as well as the respect of peers like John Prine, Steve Earle, and Emmylou Harris, who all invited her to collaborate. Merle Haggard dubbed her "the best singer I've ever heard" and asked her to join his touring band, and David Byrne and Natalie Merchant famously covered her "Let The Mystery Be" as a duet on MTV Unplugged. DeMent returned in 2012 with her most recent album, 'Sing The Delta,' which prompted NPR to call her "one of the great voices in contemporary popular music" and The Boston Globe to hail the collection as "a work of rare, unvarnished grace and power."

Meanwhile, behind the scenes, DeMent and her husband were raising their adopted Russian daughter in their Iowa City home. When she looked back on her own childhood, though, DeMent sometimes felt like there was some intangible element that hadn't quite clicked yet.

"Growing up, a lot of what I understood about my parentsand many of the adults in my life that were nurturing meI understood through music," explains DeMent, who was born the youngest of 14 children in Arkansas and raised in southern California. "I remember noticing that people seem to be most their real selves when they were in the music. My dad would cry my mom would wave her arms around when they sang church music. So I figured out at some point that there was a breakdown there with my daughter. She was six when we adopted her, and there was a whole culture that had been translated to her in those critical years that I didnt feel like I could get through to with the tools I had. So always in the back of my mind, I had this sense of wanting to figure out how to link her two worlds, Russian and American."

Akhmatova's poetry proved to be that link and more, as it drew DeMent into a remarkable journey through Russian political and artistic history.

"Her whole adult working life was marked by this constant struggle to do her work in the face of the Bolshevik Revolution, World War I, World War II, and Stalin," DeMent says of Akhmatova. "The estimates are that between 20-80 million people died during those 30 years he was in power. One of her husbands was executed, one died in the gulag, and her son was sent there twice just by virtue of being her son. She often lived in poverty and out of other peoples homes, never owned a place of her own. She wasn't some elevated star figure exempted from suffering, she was right there in it. All of her poetry came out of that."

Akhmatova's struggles weren't unique for her time in Russia, but her poetry still managed to find beauty in a world of pain and ugliness, which DeMent believes is what makes her so deeply loved by the Russian people.

"I think if you listen to her poems, you can hear all that sorrow and that burden in them," says DeMent, "but there's always a lightness, a transcendence somehow, a sense of victory over all that inhumanity that she was living with every day of her life."

It's only fitting, then, that the album opens with, "To My Poems," a short, four-line invocation recorded sparsely and simply with just DeMent's voice and piano as she sings: "You led me into the trackless woods, / My falling stars, my dark endeavor. / You were bitterness, lies, a bill of goods. / You werent a consolation--ever."

That stark pairing of piano and voice forms the heart and soul of all 18 tracks on the album, which were recorded live in DeMent's living room under the guidance of producer Richard Bennett and with a small backing band that drifts in and out of the arrangements. The music is firmly rooted in the American South, with timeless melodies that could easily be mistaken for long-forgotten hymnal entries or classic country tunes. "From An Airplane" rollicks with a honky-tonk vibe, while "Not With Deserters" is punctuated by a mournful slide guitar and rich harmonies, and "All Is Sold" ebbs and flows over lush pedal steel. That DeMent can make the work of a 20 th century Russian poet sound like Sunday morning on a cotton plantation is a testament to her versatility and depth as an artist.

"I learned from this project that I dont have just one voice, I have lots of voices, and they're all connected somehow," says DeMent. "Something happened on this record because the music wasnt tied to a place from my past or my family history, but it was linked to my daughter by way of her cultural history. I realized writing these songs that I'm linked in some way to another world, as well, and I can hear it in the music, in the way I sang and the choices I made."

DeMent is quick to credit Akhmatova (and the translators whose work formed the album's lyrics, Babette Deutsch and Lyn Coffin) for the album's beauty and magic.

"All of the poems, particularly Babettes translations, just felt like songs to me from the get go," says DeMent. "The first four or five I did, the melodies came while I was reading them the first time. That still mystifies me. My gut sense is that they were songs, already. I think she wrote them that way, and Babette picked up on that. They

flowed like that. I dont think there's any getting around that the music was already in the poems."

There's no getting around that the music is in DeMent, too. Twenty-three years after her debut, she's creating some of the most poignant music of her career, bridging two seemingly disparate worlds with every note.
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A late bloomer, Iris DeMent released her first album in 1992 at the age of 31, but quickly established herself as a respected songwriter in the Americana mode. Her music is a patchwork of country, folk, and gospel influences, sung in a breathtaking soprano twang that evokes mountain streams, county fairs, and midnight train whistles. Fans have embraced her as torch-bearer for a lineage that has been frustratingly compromised by the more commercial strains of contemporary country music. DeMent has won a Grammy for her work with John Prine, and in 2003 married fellow roots-music aficionado Greg Brown. ~ Rovi

- rovi

Iris DeMent (born January 5, 1961) is an American singer and songwriter whose musical style includes elements of country and folk music. DeMent was born near the town of Paragould, Arkansas and with her family moved from Arkansas to the Los Angeles area in 1964. While growing up, she was exposed to and influenced by country and gospel music. Dement began writing songs at the age of 25. Her first album, “Infamous Angel,” was released in 1992 and explored such themes as religious skepticism, living in a small town and forgiving human frailty. The album’s lead track, “Let the Mystery Be,” has been covered by a number of artists, including 10,000 Maniacs and Alice Stuart, and was used in the opening scenes of the 1993 feature film “Little Buddha.” The song, “Our Town,” has also been recorded by Kate Rusby, Jody Stecher, and Kate Brislin and was played in the closing moments of the final episode of the CBS TV series “Northern Exposure. On her second album, “My Life,” released in 1994, she continued the personal and introspective approach. “My Life” was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Contemporary Folk Album category and reached #16 on the Billboard Heatseekers Albums chart. DeMent's third album, “The Way I Should,” was released in 1996 and peaked at #22 on the Heatseekers chart. Featuring the protest song “Wasteland of the Free,” it became DeMent's most political work, and covered topics like sexual abuse, religion, government policy and Vietnam. DeMent married Elmer McCall in 1991, but the marriage ended in divorce. She married singer-songwriter Greg Brown in November 2002. After an eight-year hiatus, she released the gospel album “Lifeline” in 2004. Her rendition of, “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” was later used in the closing credits of the Coen brothers' 2010 film, “True Grit.” Featuring her first collection of original songs in 16 years, DeMent issued her fifth album, “Sing the Delta,” in 2012. Bo Ramsey co-produced and played electric guitar on the record and the album art featured photography from her daughter Dasha Brown and step-daughter Pieta Brown. Other guests on the album included Al Perkins, Richard Bennett (who also co-produced) and Reese Wynans.

- MediaNet

Iris DeMent says of that elusive inspirational spark, “I didn’t know when or if I’d make another record. I gave up on trying to steer it or force it and decided to just make myself available in my heart and mind as much as I could and leave the rest up to fate.”

Sixteen years after the last collection of DeMent songs, that time has come. Sing The Delta presents twelve self-penned compositions from an artist whose first three albums established her as one of the most beloved and respected writers and singers in American music.

DeMent, the last of 14 children, born in Arkansas and raised in Southern California, grew up immersed in gospel music and traditional country. She was somewhat of a late bloomer as an artist, writing her first song at age of 25. Her first release, Infamous Angel, initially issued on Rounder in 1992 before being picked up by Warner Bros., immediately established her as a promising and talented artist. Its 1994 follow-up, My Life, earned a Grammy nomination in the Contemporary Folk category. Her 1996 album The Way I Should addressed political as well as personal themes and earned a Grammy nomination, as well.

Along the way, several of DeMent’s songs became cultural touchstones. “Let The Mystery Be” found its way to MTV Unplugged as a duet by David Byrne and Natalie Merchant. “Our Town” was played over the farewell scene in the series finale of Northern Exposure. Merle Haggard, who said of DeMent, “She’s the best singer I’ve ever heard,” invited her to sit in as his piano player touring with his legendary band The Strangers. He subsequently covered two of her songs “No Time To Cry” and the gospel-tinged “The Shores of Jordan.”

DeMent remained active as an artist. She sang four duets with John Prine on In Spite of Ourselves and had a minor role in the motion picture Songcatcher as well as contributing a song to its soundtrack. She continued playing live shows and in 2004, she recorded an album of gospel songs, Lifeline, which included her rendition of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms.” In 2010 the Coen Brothers chose that song for the closing credits when they remade the classic western “True Grit.”

Still, DeMent never took for granted the arrival of an album’s worth of new songs. “Songs would come along here and there and I’d go out and sing them for people, but for a long time I just didn’t know what would become of any of them. Then last year, a door kinda opened up, and a handful of songs walked through and a few unfinished ones came together and I knew I had a record.”

- eventsfy

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416 Cedar Ave S
Minneapolis, MN 55454 (usa)

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